Hip and Groin Pain

There are severals issues that may cause hip or groin pain. Below are some common conditions we see, their causes, and how we treat them at the clinic. Just click on the condition you think you may have for more information.

What is Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome?

Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a term used to describe a number of soft tissue conditions which effect the outside of the hip joint. These include hip bursitis and gluteal tendinopathy. Gluteal tendinopathy is defined as the degeneration of the gluteal medius tendon due to weakness and overload. Hip bursitis is often accompanied with tendinopathy with the irritated tendon compressing and irritating the bursa on the hip.


What are the symptoms of Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome?

GTPS is characterised by pain on the outside of the hip. People with GTPS will find pain during walking or running, or while laying on their side while in bed. The pain of GTPS can be high, with people having to alter their gait (walking) to manage the pain.   

Characteristic signs and symptoms may include: 

  • Lateral (outside) hip pain.
  • The pain made worse with jumping, landing or running activity and sometimes with prolonged sitting.
  • The onset of pain is usually gradual and commonly related to an increase in activity.
  • Localised tenderness over the outside of the hip joint.
  • Often the hip feels very stiff first thing in the morning.
  • Difficulty laying on your side while in bed.
  • The affected hip may feel weaker than the unaffected side.

What are the causes of Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome?

Like all conditions, GTPS is often multi-factorial. Meaning there is more than one cause for why you have this condition. Medical conditions, including diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, can play a role in weaking tendons which increases your risk of injury. While sudden trauma (falls) can also play a role in causing the pain. 

  • Common causes of GTPS include:
  • Particular lower limb biomechanics creating an overload on the gluteal tendons (flat feet, knock knees).
  • Sudden increase in activity (walking, running) which has overloaded your tissue.
  • Medical conditions (Inflammatory arthritis, diabetes, hormonal imbalances) creating a physiological weakness on tendons. 
  • Weakness of the thigh and gluteal muscles.

How does Elite Foot Care Treat Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome?

At Elite Foot Care we pride ourselves in ensuring you’re back on your feet, feeling fit and healthy, as soon as possible. Identifying the cause is key, as our podiatrists will take the time to identify the potential causes for your pain. 

As GTPS is caused by an overloading of the tendon, management involves reducing tendon loading during provocative activities.  Tendon injuries, however, do not respond well to resting and hence simply doing nothing will not resolve the condition either.  
 
Instead, a very specific exercise program should be prescribed to maintain appropriate load through the tendon and to elicit a pain-relieving response within the central nervous system.  Exercises involve both isometric (sustained holds) and isotonic (slow, heavy, through range) contractions.
 
Other treatments can be utilised to help regenerate your soft tissue and reduce your pain – including dry needing or shockwave therapy. 
 
Further assessment of your walking, running or jumping biomechanics will allow our podiatrists to determine whether further interventions are indicated in preventing further aggravation of the tendon.

What is Adductor Tendinopathy?

Adductor tendinopathy is a gradual onset of groin pain as a result of an overload occurring on the groin muscle and tendons. Adductor tendinopathy will progressively worsen overtime without treatment, with more structural changes occurring on the tendon as the overload continues.

Long standing adductor tendinopathy is one of the more common conditions in sports, with athletes often playing through the early stages of groin pain until it becomes too severe.

 

What are the symptoms of Adductor Tendinopathy?

The most common symptoms or adductor tendinopathy include:

  • Pain felt during activity localised to the groin or inside thigh area
  • Difficulty producing maximal strength during kicking or running
  • Tenderness when palpating around the inner thigh
  • Pain when stretching the groin muscle
  • In some cases people may feel tenderness in their core abdominal area
 

What are the causes of Adductor Tendinopathy?

Adductor tendinopathy is often a result of overuse. The adductor muscles are very active in a broad range of sports – including running, football, horse riding, gymnastics and swimming. The repetitive nature of the movements in some of these sports and the constant change of direction in others heavily stresses the adductor tendon – making athletes more likely to have adductor tendinopathy or other groin injuries.

Other causes for adductor tendinopathy include over stretching, poor hip mobility, core muscle weakness or a sudden increase in physical activity (high demanding work, high intensity running).


How does Elite Foot Care treat Adductor Tendinopathy?

At Elite Foot Care we pride ourselves in ensuring you’re back on your feet, feeling fit and healthy, as soon as possible. Identifying the cause is key, as our podiatrists will take the time to identify the potential causes for your pain. 

As Adductor Tendinopathy is caused by an overloading of the tendon and muscle, management involves reducing tendon loading during provocative activities.  Tendon injuries, however, do not respond well to resting and hence simply doing nothing will not resolve the condition either.  

Instead, a very specific exercise program should be prescribed to maintain appropriate load through the tendon and to elicit a pain-relieving response within the central nervous system.  Exercises involve both isometric (sustained holds) and isotonic (slow, heavy, through range) contractions.

Other treatments can be utilised to help regenerate your soft tissue and reduce your pain – including dry needing or shockwave therapy. 

Further assessment of your walking, running or jumping biomechanics will allow our podiatrists to determine whether further interventions are indicated in preventing further aggravation of the tendon. 

Our Senior Podiatrist Jarrod McGuinness Discusses Hip Pain

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07 5328 3588

What We Treat

Woombye Clinic

4/40 Wilson Avenue, Woombye, 4559

(Corner of Nambour Connection & Blackall Range)

Sippy Downs Clinic

19 Lakehead Drive, Sippy Downs, 4556

(Ocean Family Medicine)

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